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7Apr
2016

White Bean Chocolate Chip Cookies

Last summer, when I stayed at my sister’s house in Pennsylvania, I winged my first ever batch of white bean chocolate chip cookies. I had brought sorghum flour, ground flax seeds, and packets of Knox gelatin in my suitcase, and supplemented the rest of the ingredients with a trip to Trader Joe’s. Woot Woot to the Trader Joe’s in State College, which was NOT there when I was a student at Penn State!

white bean chocolate chip cookies ingredients

THEY TURNED OUT SO WELL. You can see my virgin batch on Instagram, tinted green because the picture was taken outside on my sister’s patio, under her green umbrella.

white bean chocolate chip cookies

Staying at her house last August was truly one of the best weeks I’ve had in a really long time. These cookies take me back to how happy and alive I was to eat them during my time in Pennsylvania. If you remember, last year I struggled with depression. The hot, Pennsylvanian summer was sunshine to all the dark, struggling places in my heart that felt lost and hopeless. When I eat these white bean chocolate chip cookies, I remember that feeling. I remember joy.

But then there’s the fact that THIS IS A CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIE I CAN EAT.  That in and of itself is pure delight.

I need to remind you that I have no concept of normal food. I haven’t eaten normal food for over ten years. I eat archerfriendly. I try to limit sweeteners as much as possible because I have insulin resistance. I also have multiple food allergies and reactions. And then there’s the SIBO (Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth) I need to re-test. Let’s forget about the SIBO for now, because these cookies as-is are not SIBO friendly. People, what am I going to eat if I have to embark on the excruciating Specific Carbohydrate Diet with insulin resistance and multiple food reactions!?

Now, these are weirdo cookies, because they’re everything free. That means they are delicate. They work best stored in the fridge and eaten cold. This is how I like them and this is how you should eat them. When warm, fresh out of the oven, they are fragile and tender and can break easily — just like your heart. They taste great warm, but for longevity and texture, just keep them in the fridge, ok?

I put gelatin in my cookies to bump up the protein content. If you are vegan, the cookie recipe should work without it, due to the flax. I haven’t had a chance to make a fully vegan version, but they are egg-free!

Oh, and let’s talk about chocolate chips before I sign out. They are not all equal. I like Sunspire’s dark chocolate chips, way less sugar than Trader Joe’s! Trader Joe’s are cheap, though, but you’re paying for the extra sugar. I also like Equal Exchange’s Organic Bittersweet Chocolate Chips (70% Cacao). Last summer at my sister’s house, I used the Trader Joe’s version because it was easy to find.  If you’re using dark chocolate chips, you really should be buying the chocolate chips with the LEAST amount of sugar in them. The ones I’ve found with the least amount of sugar are Sunspire’s… without having to go to the stevia ones that have erythritol in them. Sugar alcohols kill my belly so I avoid those.

I can’t wait for you to try these! This is my only chocolate chip recipe to date. I’m trying to get all of my go-to archerfriendly recipes up on the blog. There’s a long list. I love sharing them with you. Let me know what you think!

 

Curious if you should be eating these White Bean Chocolate Chip Cookies instead of Toll House Chocolate Chip Cookies? Dr. Archer can answer that for you!

Dr. Archer offers food allergy and food sensitivity testing in her Snohomish office and can also help you figure out if you need to avoid Toll House Chocolate Chip Cookies for blood sugar reasons!

Dr. Archer is a naturopathic physician specializing in food allergies, food sensitivities, SIBO, pre-diabetes, insulin resistance, and diabetes. She sees both kids and adults from all over the greater Seattle area. Click here to schedule an appointment.

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